Sticky Article Japanese Film Documents Edgar Cayce’s Work

Japanese Film Documents Edgar Cayce’s Work
In Japan, a new documentary film highlights Cayce and the impact of his work on humanity.

Virginia Beach, Va. – With an organizational vision focused on oneness, the mission of Edgar Cayce’s Association for Research and Enlightenment (A.R.E.) appeals (and applies!) to people the world over. In Japan, a new documentary film highlights Cayce and the impact of his work on humanity. Directed by Tetsu Shiratori, The Readings premiered in Japan in November and will feature a U.S. premiere March 10, 2018, at 2 p.m., at a conference in Olympia, Wash. Edgar Cayce’s A.R.E. will host an English-dubbed premiere of the film on June 22, at 7 p.m., at its Virginia Beach headquarters.

The Edgar Cayce Center in Japan is one of the largest international affiliates of A.R.E., so it’s not surprising that a Cayce documentary would launch from this country. Visionary Japanese director Tetsu learned about Cayce after visiting the Cayce Center in Tokyo. His discovery of the astonishing Cayce health remedies for diabetes, rheumatism, psoriasis, and more, led to his desire to make this documentary. “There are many Japanese people who have helped heal themselves from illness and disease by following the Cayce remedies,” said Shigeru Mitsuda, the president of Edgar Cayce Japan. “Tetsu became so fascinated by this practical information, he was inspired to make this film.”

Shooting took place in Cayce’s birthplace of Hopkinsville, Ky., and at the A.R.E. headquarters in Virginia Beach, Va. Tetsu interviewed many people both in U.S. and in Japan who testified to the value of the Cayce readings. The documentary also includes re-enactments of some legendary Cayce moments, including how Cayce saved his wife through his own readings.

“Tetsu’s movies always deliver such important messages for the world and they are so touching,” Michiko Hayashi, International Ambassador and Global Director of the Emoto Peace Project in Tokyo said. “The movie has much to teach us about making the earth a healthy and harmonious place.” 

Tetsu’s 2012 documentary, INORI, broke records in Japan after being in theaters for more than three years, the longest screening period in that country’s history.  Tetsu’s body of film works includes:  Stone Age (2005), Soul Education (2008), The Era of Fasting (2010), INORI - Prayer - Conversation with Something Great (2012), Revival (2015), and The Readings (2018).

Kevin J. Todeschi, executive director and CEO of Edgar Cayce’s A.R.E., has high expectations for all who see the 90-minute feature. “This film will help to transform human consciousness,” Todeschi said.

Learn more at http://officetetsushiratori.com/readings/en/.

Edgar Cayce (1877-1945) founded the non-profit Association for Research and Enlightenment (A.R.E.) in 1931, to explore spirituality, holistic health, intuition, dream interpretation, psychic development, reincarnation, and ancient mysteries—all subjects that frequently came up in the more than 14,000 documented psychic readings given by Cayce, who died in 1945. The mission of A.R.E. is to create opportunities for profound personal change in body, mind, and spirit through the wisdom found in the Edgar Cayce material. The Virginia Beach headquarters is a popular site for locals and tourists with free daily lectures, a Health Center & Spa, the Cayce/Reilly® School of Massage, an extensive metaphysical library, a meditation garden, a stone labyrinth, and a bookstore and gift shop. The campus is also home to Atlantic University which offers two masters degrees (Transpersonal Psychology and Leadership Studies) through an online platform, as well as continuing education and certificate programs. Through A.R.E.’s many programs, services, publications, and membership outreach, individuals from all walks of life and religious backgrounds are provided with tools for personal transformation and healing at all levels—body, mind, and spirit. For more information, please visit EdgarCayce.org.

 

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